Challenging Militarism

Glasgow Against The Arms Fair

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Scotland Against Militarism and CAAT Scotland – https://www.facebook.com/events/167835827222318/

Prisoners for Peace Day

The International Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

a day for public awareness and education about the threat posed to humanity by nuclear weapons and to mobilize international efforts towards achieving the common goal of a nuclear-weapon-free world. – See more at: http://www.un.org/en/events/nuclearweaponelimination/

Independence from America event

Wednesday, July 4, 2018

The annual call for Independence from America will be made at the main gates of Menwith Hill on the afternoon of Wednesday 4th July 2018. Speakers, music, stalls and food. A valuable opportunity to meet others seeking a more peaceful world. https://www.caab.org.uk/events/wed-07042018-1600/independence-america-ev...

Bradford vs the Bomb

Wednesday, July 4, 2018

BRADFORD BD1 1BL. With CND general secretary Kate Hudson; director of the Bradford Peace Museum David Kennedy; and campaigner and academic Michael Randle. Part of Bradford Literature Festival. £7/£3/free. 7.30pm. The Wool Exchange, Hustlergate. More info: https://bradfordlitfest.ticketsolve.com/shows/1173587379

Stop Arming Saudi Arabia. Silent Vigil

Saturday, June 30, 2018

CHESTER. 12.30-1.30 at The Cross, Chester. Last Saturday each month. Contact [email protected] Wheelchair accessible

TERRIBLE TREATMENT OF A C.O. IN DETENTION BARRACKS

From The Tribunal, March 14th 1918

This is a further update in a series of extracts from the No Conscription Fellowship’s journal, published in the UK between March 1916 and November 1918
For other extracts go to: http://nfpb.org.uk/tribunal

A shocking case of the ill-treatment of a Conscientious Objector at the hands of the military has just come to light, and illustrates in a forcible manner the brutality which exists in Military Detention Barracks.

Maurice Andrews, of Aberaman, a Russian Jew, aged 22, who left Russia at the age of seven, was arrested last December, court-martialled at Wrexham on January 22nd, and sent to Hereford Detention Barracks to serve a sentence of 56 days detention. There he was ordered to put on uniform and refused. What happened to him is described in a letter written on March 3rd by a friend who had just visited him in the gruard-room at Wrexham, whither he has been returned for another court-martial:-

“Poor fellow! He has been treated worse than a dog bu the military authorities. He has only been in their hands two months, and the biggest part of the time he has served in Hereford Military Prison. He is practically a physical wreck. He was shivering when I spoke to him this morning, as the guard-room was covered with ice. I will try to relate to you what he told me he had been through. He was sent from Wrexham to Hereford. There he refused to recognise orders. They stripped him of his civies, and left him in a cold cell in a singlet and pants for eight days. They refused to return his civvies, forced him into khaki and put him in a padded cell. They were strapping his hands behind his back for four hours every day. They relinquished the strap torture for the handcuffs, but afterwards found he could unloose his trousers with his handcuffs on, and they again used the strap. His wrists, poor fellow, I think he will bear bear the marks for life. He was put on No. 1 diet for two or three days a week. He hunger struck for two and a half days as a protest against this agony. Then they brought him before the Chief Commandant, but he was forced to wear khaki to return to Wrexham. He is in danger of physical collapse.”

And all this in spite of the fact that is clearly laid down in the Army Act that brutality is illegal! But this state of affairs in military detention barracks is only part and parcel of the whole brutal military machine. A soldier, who was recently giving some account of life in detention barracks, added: “But unless they make detention so terrible that a man would do anything sooner than endure it again, they would never keep discipline in the Army.” Could there be a stronger indictment of the whole system?

Andrews has now been court-martialled again, and is awaiting the promulgation of his sentence. He is clearly in no condition to face further imprisonment, even in a civil prison, to which, as a Conscientious Objector, he should have been sent in the first instance. The least that the authorities can do, in face of what he has suffered, is to discharge him from the Army.

Changing the Narrative for Peace - Engaging with the Media

Saturday, June 16, 2018

NFPB workshop at Manchester Meeting House. please register as soon as possible by contacting Philip Austin Tel: 01204 382330 [email protected] https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/changing-the-narrative-for-peace-engaging...

International perspectives

We were reminded at our gathering of NFPB members and other Friends, in Lancaster on 12th May, of the maxim to ‘think globally, act locally’. At the meeting we heard about the work of the International Peace Bureau (IPBhttp://www.ipb.org/ ) , of which we have been a member for many years but without being very actively so.

WHAT A SOLDIER THINKS

From The Tribunal March 7th 1918

This is a further update in a series of extracts from the No Conscription Fellowship’s journal, published in the UK between March 1916 and November 1918.
For further extracts go to: http://nfpb.org.uk/tribunal

CAPTAIN GWNNE, M.p., ON CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS.

Speaking in the House of Commons on June 26th, 1917, Captain Gwynne, M.P. said:

“These are people who are not a blight upon the community; they may prove to be the very salt of the community. I am speaking now as one who has seen war. I think that everybody who has seen war has one governing desire, and that is to see war abolished from the world. I am not at all sure that these people, whom we propose to reject as outcasts of the State, may not be the best people to help in the fight to make an end of war. There is one thing that nobody can deny them, and that is courage, the most difficult form of courage in this world, the courage of the individual against the crowd. That is a courage which every State will do well to protect and guard. That is the courage which, above all others, makes for freedom. It is for that that I desire to see these men electors, and that I vote for giving them votes – just exactly as I would give votes to the soldiers – because they are the people who have shown not merely physical courage, but because they have made civic responsibility their plea. They have shown a spirit of initiative. These people, in refusing to act, have taken action which must have been extremely difficult to take, and when we are told that the good of the nation is somehow impaired by allowing these men a voice in our national councils, I ask myself. ‘What is the good of the nation’? Are you going to advance the real interests of this country, or of any country, by stamping out such people from among your full citizens? Progress, as far as I can understand, comes not with the crowd, but with individuals. Freedom in the last resort is won by individuals working against the crowd, and these are the people who make for freedom. It is in the interests of freedom during a war that is fought, at all events professedly, for freedom that I resist this attempt to limit what is the exercise of their legal freedom, and what is, I think with the Noble Lord, the exercise of higher morals.”

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